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View Full Version : Vinyl cleaning brush is not the answer...



KingRT10
January 15, 2014, 11:12 PM
What is the next step up to cleaning Vinyl quick, over just a Vinyl brush?
A Vinyl brush does not seem to rid the pops.

I am looking for a quicker fix, if there is one, besides a machine.

(I own a machine and it's a process, not quick.)

highEndguy
January 15, 2014, 11:26 PM
4465In The Groove Record Cleaner

look for it on Amazon
works wonders

Mike
January 15, 2014, 11:27 PM
Rob will no doubt have some good suggestions. Hopefully he chimes in here.


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Mike
January 15, 2014, 11:30 PM
In The Groove Record Cleaner

look for it on Amazon
works wonders

Great suggestion. Thanks Nelson.


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dev
January 15, 2014, 11:40 PM
I hate cleaning records period but it's gotta be done for many reasons along with sonic improvements and protecting my delicate needle from damage and unnecessary rear and tear. My personal process upon receiving records is to always clean and store in a new sleeve, sometimes like now they pile up :(

I have found I'm able to re-use several times prior to having "wanting" to re-clean, prior to playing I clean with my brush and all is good.

A/V Solutions
January 16, 2014, 02:54 PM
Wet cleaning is really the only effective way to clean LP's IMO.....brushes and alike are more for maintenance (removing surface debris) like what's attracted to the LP while its out of its jacket during play. Spend the time the with the first go around cleaning them then maintenance (dry brush) is all that's needed for a good while. I have LP's that I haven't cleaned for more than a year that play like the day I cleaned them. New inner sleeves, proper storage, not leaving the LP on the table for a period of time, not eating food and handling the LP's are all good things to follow.....YMMV!!!

ohbythebay
January 16, 2014, 03:26 PM
Wet cleaning is really the only effective way to clean LP's IMO.....brushes and alike are more for maintenance (removing surface debris) like what's attracted to the LP while its out of its jacket during play. Spend the time the with the first go around cleaning them then maintenance (dry brush) is all that's needed for a good while. I have LP's that I haven't cleaned for more than a year that play like the day I cleaned them. New inner sleeves, proper storage, not leaving the LP on the table for a period of time, not eating food and handling the LP's are all good things to follow.....YMMV!!!

I am with Jeff...I will say this

I keep my records clean but invariably, they will get a spot or two(or more..lol) of dust on them that can be annoying.

So I always use a discwasher brush lightly (no liquid)with the table spinning but before removing, I work my way OUT so that that last bit can be moved OFF the vinyl with the brush. If you leave it parallel and just lift the brush, you wind up with a wall/line at some point .

Think of a broom. If you pull dirt to a point and LIFT the broom, you have a line of dirt the width of the broom...but if you drag that broom OFF an edge? Make sense?

Oh and the sleeves ? If I do keep a paper sleeve is for show because I have replaced ALL will plastic sleeves. Plastic sleeves don't shed paper dust...LOL

get an original one that looks like this
Original Discwasher Record Cleaning Walnut Handle Brush | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/original-DISCWASHER-record-cleaning-walnut-handle-brush-/171046829932?pt=US_Vinyl_Record_Cleaning&hash=item27d32f7f6c)

NOT the brown suede new ones////
RCA Discwasher D4 Vinyl Record Care System Dust Brush Cleaning Pad New SEALED | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/RCA-Discwasher-D4-Vinyl-Record-Care-SYSTEM-Dust-Brush-Cleaning-Pad-New-Sealed-/321173328942?pt=US_Vinyl_Record_Cleaning&hash=item4ac76c142e)

Mikado463
January 16, 2014, 03:47 PM
I am with Jeff...

likewise....................


get an original one that looks like this
Original Discwasher Record Cleaning Walnut Handle Brush | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/original-DISCWASHER-record-cleaning-walnut-handle-brush-/171046829932?pt=US_Vinyl_Record_Cleaning&hash=item27d32f7f6c)



here's where I totally disagree.............ANY wood handled brush with a synthetic 'mop' does one thing really good.....builds up static charge (why do you think discwasher pioneered their static gun in conjunction with their cleaning brush back in the day !). A much better alternative is to use a metal handle brush with carbon fibre that will conduct static charge 'from' the record. I have one (not by my system now, can't remember the name....something '2 plus 2') that combines a chamois material in one row with carbon fibre in another........Waaaaay better than Discwasher !

A/V Solutions
January 16, 2014, 04:41 PM
I have also found while using a carbon brush is to take your free hand and touch the chassis of another component while brushing......dust and stuff will see its way to the carbon bristles with less resistance. Sometimes the carbon brush will leave a small line of stuff behind but when your grounded its less so.

BobM
January 16, 2014, 05:07 PM
When I visited VPI over the summer for their demo of the new direct drive TT and 3D arm we saw Peter from Soundsmith giving a bit of a seminar. At the end he opened the floor to questions and of course someone asked about his record cleaning preferences.

What was very curious was that he said if you clean a record, then go to place it on the turntable and breath or speak over it, the moisture from your breath will make pops and clicks where you just cleaned. Something that innocuous causes pops and clicks.

The lesson I guess is to tilt your head, or hold your breath, or breathe out somewhere not over the record when you are handling them if you want to minimize pops and clicks after a good wet cleaning.

A/V Solutions
January 16, 2014, 07:05 PM
Maybe this will help......

4473

rszk
August 26, 2014, 11:37 AM
I have a VPI 16.5, and a carbon fiber brush, but what I've found works is just using a can of compressed air. It is super quick to use, I just use it when the record is turning, just before I cue the stylus. Not sure if anyone else has done this, but it is my method.

MusicDirector
August 27, 2014, 09:35 PM
No record brush is designed to clean records. They are for dusting only. Nothing beats a properly cleaned record and no brush will work on a dirty record. In fact, it's the worst thing you could do.
I have a VPI 16.5 and an Audioquest brush, Zerostat, goat hair bush and picked up one of those sticky groove rollers, but have not tried it yet. Any of those items I do not use on a record until it has been cleaned well. I like the goat hair brush the most so far, but that's me. Any of those choices are fine for dusting before play. I also use Magic Eraser for cleaning my stylus before and after each side.
That's just my take on it.

MusicDirector
August 27, 2014, 09:37 PM
I have a VPI 16.5, and a carbon fiber brush, but what I've found works is just using a can of compressed air. It is super quick to use, I just use it when the record is turning, just before I cue the stylus. Not sure if anyone else has done this, but it is my method.

Hmm, of course as long as it's pointed away from the cart, that is not a half-bad idea. I never thought of that, then again those darn air cans are pricey. My only concern is that sometimes a bit of frejon shoots out and I'm not sure if that does any harm or not.

Steve
August 28, 2014, 07:31 AM
Employ a Vinyl Nazi. I don't think there is any other way around it if you want to ensure the preservation of the vinyl & longevity of the stylus.

The 16 Step Vinyl Nazi Protocol:


By NEW vinyl or used vinyl from other Vinyl Nazis with satisfactory grading of M-/M-.
Open Carefully. Remove any shrink-wrap to eliminate longer term compression damage to the jacket. A blade along the opening works well, if you have a steady hand. Use a microfiber cloth or cotton gloves if you don't want to oil the artwork. Nothing worse than a "Dark Side to The Moon" with smudged finger prints permanently etched into the printed material.
Remove new vinyl from inner sleeve. Do not re-use inner sleeve. It has traces of mould release compound in it. Re-insert empty inner-sleeve into jacket for collective value.
Wash vinyl with an automatic cleaner. You can argue the toss over AudioDesk vs Klaudio. The Vinyl Nazi's preference is AudioDesk because the ultrasonics were not designed for warfare. 1-2 complete wash cycles should remove any mould release compound residue.
While the record is being washed, cut out any insignia, promotional stickers and/or barcodes stuck on any plastic wraps. Put these aside.
Carefully using a microfiber cloth or cotton gloves, negotiate the jacket into a 4-mil poly plastic jacket sleeve. If it is a thick gatefold jacket, use a 6-mil poly plastic jacket sleeve. Optionally but preferably, depending on jacket thickness & choice of poly sleeve, carefully insert into a Japanese resealable outer sleeve also. If this is not possible, you can apply a resealable tape or sticker to close the poly sleeve. This task is best performed with the vinyl out, so outer poly liners should be orientated for access to the jacket opening.
Once your LP is dry, carefully remove the disc from the cleaner using the edge. A micro fiber cloth or carbon brush can be used to carefully spread any last speck of water droplet for it to evaporate quicker.
While handling vinyl, you are of course not wearing any static sensitive clothing or shoes. Also, the humidity levels in your home & particularly in the listening room are set just right. An RH of around 50% should be OK.
When walking with the vinyl, use a firm inner upper finger grip to the edge diameters & walk with the edge facing your body & your head turned sideways. Minimising the surface area contact to air in motion will help avoid particulate contact with the playing surface. Your shallow breathing away from the direction of the record will also minimise any biological expulsions from landing on the playing surface. If you have a lit cigar in your mouth, perhaps it is time to consider transitioning to digital.
Assuming your platter mat has already been blasted with compressed air, you are ready to flip the record onto the table.
Small carbon brush at the ready in case your motion has lifted any nearby dust particles. You have dunked your stylus into the Onzow ZeroDust & are ready to enjoy the music.
Wow. That 45rpm LP finished quickly. Time your lift your relaxed & laden self out of the listening chair, especially if reclined. Don't rush the table. Beware of the footfall & risk of creating airborne particulates with quick & sudden movement. Hit that mute button just in time & reach for the lifter.
At a complete stop, perhaps after some very gentle finger braking on the record weight, your played LP is now ready to be lifted for placement back into the record cleaning machine. Watch your step!
Once clean, use a new inner sleeve to archive for next time.
Using a sticker & felt tip, grade LP & jacket & date playtime for next time. Best to place the sticker on the rear of the poly slip/Jap sleeve as not to detract from the front artwork. Find a spot that doesn't cover any printed reading material on the back of the cover either.
Lastly, don't forget to pop those cut-outs in there before sealing the sleeve too! :D

rszk
August 28, 2014, 08:16 AM
Oh my I didn't realize there was a term for my condition. I employ a lot of those...:amazing:

Myles B. Astor
August 28, 2014, 09:03 AM
No record brush is designed to clean records. They are for dusting only. Nothing beats a properly cleaned record and no brush will work on a dirty record. In fact, it's the worst thing you could do.
I have a VPI 16.5 and an Audioquest brush, Zerostat, goat hair bush and picked up one of those sticky groove rollers, but have not tried it yet. Any of those items I do not use on a record until it has been cleaned well. I like the goat hair brush the most so far, but that's me. Any of those choices are fine for dusting before play. I also use Magic Eraser for cleaning my stylus before and after each side.
That's just my take on it.

Not necessarily. Ones like the Decca brush/pad and similar ilk have micro photographs showing they do indeed clean the grooves. Not nearly as well as wet cleaning but they do indeed clean the grooves.

http://www.dak.com/reviews/3306story.cfm#pics3

Steve
August 28, 2014, 09:15 AM
Not necessarily. Ones like the Decca brush/pad and similar ilk have micro photographs showing they do indeed clean the grooves. Not nearly as well as wet cleaning but they do indeed clean the grooves.

DAK's Carbon Fiber Anti Static Record Cleaning System (http://www.dak.com/reviews/3306story.cfm#pics3)

Great link with fantastic groove pics!

GaryProtein
August 28, 2014, 10:46 AM
4465In The Groove Record Cleaner

look for it on Amazon
works wonders

I had a cleaner very similar to that years ago. It was also made of a sticky polymer that thoroughly cleaned out the grooves. In the Amazon review, it says to clean the device by running it under water and drying it with a paper towel. DON'T DO THAT. Shake and/or blow it and let it air dry. Paper towels can leave lint on the cleaner.

MusicDirector
August 28, 2014, 11:00 AM
Not necessarily. Ones like the Decca brush/pad and similar ilk have micro photographs showing they do indeed clean the grooves. Not nearly as well as wet cleaning but they do indeed clean the grooves.

DAK's Carbon Fiber Anti Static Record Cleaning System (http://www.dak.com/reviews/3306story.cfm#pics3)

Thanks Myles, I may pick up one of those (or maybe even two) when I get the chance (once I start doing better), to try it out. Some records can also have a slightly stubborn speck or two in the grooves where a combo of wet cleaning and a good brush will eventually work them out. (Of course never scrub even slightly with a dry brush or any brush, the speck will work itself out over time).
I do wonder what makes something like the Decca brush different from a carbon fiber brush as far as getting in the grooves are concerned, if there is a difference? Is the Decca brush similar to the Hunt brush?

MusicDirector
August 28, 2014, 11:04 AM
I had a cleaner very similar to that years ago. It was also made of a sticky polymer that thoroughly cleaned out the grooves. In the Amazon review, it says to clean the device by running it under water and drying it with a paper towel. DON'T DO THAT. Shake and/or blow it and let it air dry. Paper towels can leave lint on the cleaner.

Indeed. I'm rather surprised they even put that in the directions. I had a similar item for clothing (probably exactly the same) and it is not a matter of a paper towel "can" leave lint, I can attest that paper towel or any drying method other than air WILL leave a ton of lint on it rendering it unusable.

Steve
August 28, 2014, 11:14 AM
Has anyone tried one of those "The Sticky Buddy" or "Schticky" rollers that they advertise on the late night TV home shopping shows?